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  • Echeveria Flower Necklace (Echeveria)

Echeveria Flower Necklace (Echeveria)

153.00
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Echeveria Flower Necklace (Echeveria)

153.00

Designed to look like the flowering stalk of an echeveria plant, this 3D printed heart necklace is our best approximation of the beauty of this bright and voluptuous succulent.

Suspended from a 24 inch sterling rope chain, little budding flowers dot the pendant. Some buds towards the top are more open than their smaller siblings towards the bottom. Cast in sterling silver, the piece has been lightly antiqued so that the texture is accentuated with a golden hue.

  • Sterling silver, light yellow antiquing

  • 24” rope chain

  • 3D printed design

  • Ships in 2 weeks

Native to Mexico and Central America, echeverias grow only a couple inches off the ground, but their flower spike can stretch up to knee height in its attempt to attract hummingbirds and butterflies. This plant, like many others, was named after a famous Mexican botanical artist, Atanasio Echeverría y Godoy, which has become both the plant’s common and scientific name.

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Designed to look like the flowering stalk of an echeveria plant, this 3D printed heart necklace is our best approximation of the beauty of this bright and voluptuous succulent.

Suspended from a 24 inch sterling rope chain, little budding flowers dot the pendant. Some buds towards the top are more open than their smaller siblings towards the bottom. Cast in sterling silver, the piece has been lightly antiqued so that the texture is accentuated with a golden hue.

  • Sterling silver, light yellow antiquing

  • 24” rope chain

  • 3D printed design

  • Ships in 2 weeks

Native to Mexico and Central America, echeverias grow only a couple inches off the ground, but their flower spike can stretch up to knee height in its attempt to attract hummingbirds and butterflies. This plant, like many others, was named after a famous Mexican botanical artist, Atanasio Echeverría y Godoy, which has become both the plant’s common and scientific name.