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Butterfly Milkweed Gold Studs (Asclepias tuberosa)

150.00
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Butterfly Milkweed Gold Studs (Asclepias tuberosa)

150.00

This tiny flower comes from a plant known as butterfly milkweed.  We cast a few of these flowers in June right as they were beginning to bud.  

The cones on the outside are about to open into petals and you can see the filament-like stamens tucked into them, while the central disk is smoothed and polished to a high shine.

  • 14 karat gold earrings and post

  • 3/8 inch diameter

  • Ships with 14 karat metal backs encased in silicone to ensure an extra tight fit.

  • Ships in 1-2 days

These tiny flowers are incredibly complex, with the ability to trap and mechanically attach their pollen to insects instead of relying on chance friction pollination.   They are also the only flower that the Monarch butterfly will lay its larva on.  The plant is bitter and poisonous to most of its predators, so the young caterpillars hatch, eat the milkweed, and have instant armor.  

Instagram or Facebook: @shademetals

Shipping and Return Policy 

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This tiny flower comes from a plant known as butterfly milkweed.  We cast a few of these flowers in June right as they were beginning to bud.  

The cones on the outside are about to open into petals and you can see the filament-like stamens tucked into them, while the central disk is smoothed and polished to a high shine.

  • 14 karat gold earrings and post

  • 3/8 inch diameter

  • Ships with 14 karat metal backs encased in silicone to ensure an extra tight fit.

  • Ships in 1-2 days

These tiny flowers are incredibly complex, with the ability to trap and mechanically attach their pollen to insects instead of relying on chance friction pollination.   They are also the only flower that the Monarch butterfly will lay its larva on.  The plant is bitter and poisonous to most of its predators, so the young caterpillars hatch, eat the milkweed, and have instant armor.  

Instagram or Facebook: @shademetals

Shipping and Return Policy